Tropical Storm Nicole, Hurricane Ian and the Role of Business in Recovery

Heart-breaking images across Volusia County and Florida have been etched in the minds of those who could just glimpse at the drone footage of destruction that hurricanes Ian and Nicole left in their trail. The destruction was greatly powered by the fact that the winds combined with what's called: King Tide. As defined by the EPA, "The king tide is the highest predicted high tide of the year at a coastal location. It is above the highest water level reached at high tide on an average day. King tides are also known as perigean spring tides."


In our Filo #1 county of Volusia, cities of Port Orange, Daytona Beach Shores, New Smyrna Beach and Daytona Beach were greatly affected. Residents have lost homes, business owners their businesses, infrastructure got a beatdown.


Loss, loss, loss.


However, loss is not where we want to stop...


Role Organizations Play Out of those devastating loses we pray, hope and take action to build back our area. It's in times like these that the private sector has an incredible power to unite, encourage and support those who need it the most. At the very least what we all can do is share encouraging energy.


Trying to find a way to demonstrate that the cup is half-full and not half-empty.


.There is so much that each one of us can do to contribute and it goes beyond money.


Restaurants like ours are donating food to families, leveraging the vast network of stakeholders to do whatever they can to help. It's when organizations unite that we provide best emergency recovery. After Ian and Nicole, it is the private sector, non-governmental and faith-based organizations that are providing critical resources across Volusia to help save lives and protect property. It's organizations that provide critical resources to help facilitate community and economic recovery. Economic recovery by providing jobs is what we at Filo are best at. These disasters have reminded me why we either grow or we die. By growing, Filo is able to create more, offer more, do more. With each meal sold, with each new location opened, with each new deal struck, we increase our leverage to take care of the families and the communities that depend on our success It's in times like these that I truly understand why we have to grow. Why we have the responsibility to grow, and how that growth can benefit all of our stakeholders instead of only the ownership of Filo. If more restaurants adopted the mindset that "If you can't you must, and if you must you can", they will see success as their duty. This is why I see our success as our duty. Duty to our families, ourselves and our communities.


Credit: Photo by News 13



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